Designer. Developer. Writer.

Hi. there..

I'm Pankaj Parashar, 26yo developer, designer and writer from India. I make things for the web and write about them on my blog here.

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Optimizing website using GTmetrix

Recently, I’ve started using GTmetrix to analyze and improve the performance of my personal website. It allows you to audit your website against industry benchmarks like PageSpeed, YSlow etc. and also provides a video and a filmstrip to demonstrate the perceived rendering of your website.

I’m very happy about the results with benchmarks running close to 100%, page loading under half-a-second and significantly smaller payload.

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Less vs Sass

Matthew Dean, a core-team member of Less wrote an interesting piece, comparing Less with Sass and highlighting important differences between the design decisions of the two pre-processors. Obviously, there is no clear winner here!

I’ve been using Sass, for as long as I can remember but the arguments made by Matt in his article are compelling enough for me to atleast try Less. If you don’t believe me, go read his article.

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Magic methods

Python's got a bunch of very useful magic methods that most of us do not use in day-to-day practice. This article is all about the dunder methods that can add magic to your python code.

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Atomizer Web

A web app to generate Atomic CSS from the input markup that uses Atomic classes. It is based on node.js library, Atomizer by Yahoo, which is then wired into a JavaScript library using Browserify.

The latest version also has the ability to specify configuration to generate custom classes based on the configuration file. Simply copy-paste the markup on the left and you’ll get the Atomic CSS output on your right.

v2 of Atomic CSS has,

Screenshot for Atomizer Web app
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The Diaper Pattern

Mike Pirnat wrote about the diaper pattern almost 6 years ago, but the essence of his writing is still fresh in my mind. It refers to the practice of catching generic exceptions in your code, allowing them to silently pass through your code which could yield dangerous results.

Its called diaper because it catches all the shit. In practice, it is always recommended to catch specific exceptions and let the code break for any runtime exceptions. This principle is not new and has been captured in the Zen of Python - PEP20.

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Migration to Polymer 1.0

I wrote a new article for Sitepoint after a while about migrating your web application to the latest version of the Polymer library. I am not particularly happy with some of the upgrades but the new version certianly makes the library much faster than its predecessor.

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Webucator - Python Training

The awesome folks at Webucator converted my article on Regular Expressions in Python into a training video which can be found here on Youtube. I particularly liked the concept of transforming an article into a full length training video and I must say that Webucator has done an incredible job.

Webucator also offers customized Python training for public online classes and self-paced Python courses for individual students on its website. I couldn’t be more happier to recommend them not just for learning Python but a bunch of other languages as well that they have to offer.

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Building a Todo app with React.js

This is my first attempt with React.js to build a basic Todo app. React has gained massive traction as a JavaScript library for building user interfaces largely because it is built by Facebook and their engineers have challenged the age-old best practice for separation of concerns. We'll learn how.

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Best practices vs HTTP 2.0

This post is all about the introduction of HTTP 2.0 into the mainstream by putting it side-to-side with some of the best practices that we have engineered and cultivated over the years.

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Credit Card Custom Element with Polymer

Yet another article for SitePoint toying with the idea of creating a custom element for a payment form using credit card with Polymer. Lately, Polymer has undergone few functional changes that has been discussed in this article.

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Scoping of index variables in Python

The way scoping of index variables work in Python might surprise a few! This article is all about dealing with them by considering few scenarios and understanding the behavior.

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Mapping on iOS and Android

The UX Launchpad team has done an in-depth analysis and a comprehensive review of comparing the mapping experience on iOS and Android. The article uses a bunch of parameters to evaluate the user experience on both the apps with no clear winner.

Comparison of mapping experience on both iOS and Android
Google Maps (left) v/s Apple Maps (right)

The idea behind this article is to teach rather than judge, with just a bunch of design lessons inspired from studying two similar products. Do not complain if you find the article too long for your liking!

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Beautify CSS code using Codepen

Few would argue that Codepen has been an indispensable tool for the Frontend developer community. Although, I have been using Codepen for a long time, only recently, I realised that it can also be used to beautify your compressed CSS code.

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CSS Selectors Level 4

Not-so long ago I remember writing about CSS Selectors Level 3. Fast-forward 14 months, I'm now writing about the next specification of CSS that aims to improve and enhance CSS3 by introducing wide-range of new selectors and pseudo-classes.

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Connect Four

Just need two players and a mouse to play with! First player to connect four consecutive blocks in any direction, wins. Built using HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript with bonus unit test cases written in Qunit.

Connect Four